David Albert Jones

David Albert Jones

St Mary’s University College

Experts Meetings

Professor David Albert Jones read Natural Sciences and Philosophy at Cambridge (1984-1987) and Theology at Oxford (1992-2000). His doctorate was published as Approaching the End: a theological exploration of death and dying (Oxford University Press 2007).

In 2010 he was appointed Director of the Anscombe Bioethics Centre (previously known as the Linacre Centre for Healthcare Ethics), the principal Roman Catholic bioethics center in the United Kingdom. He has represented the view of the Catholic Church in relation to the human embryo in evidence to the House of Lords Select Committee on Stem Cell Research (2001), the Nuffield Council on neonates (2005), the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee on Hybrid and Chimera Embryos (2007). 

He has written several articles specifically on religious perspectives on the embryo. His major work on the subject, The Soul of the Embryo: An Enquiry into the Status of the Human Embryo in the Christian Tradition (Continuum 2004) was positively reviewed by Sir Anthony Kenny in the TLS and Rabbi Julia Neuberger in The Lancet and was short-listed for the Michael Ramsey Prize 2007. 

Professor Jones is Program Director of the MA in Bioethics and of the Foundation Degree in Healthcare Chaplaincy at St Mary’s University College, Twickenham and is Director of the Centre for Bioethics and Emerging Technologies. He is also on the Ministry of Defense Research Ethics Committee and is on a working party of the General Medical Council.

Read Anne Barbeau Gardiner's review of The Soul of the Embryo in Touchstone.

Read an interview with Professor Jones regarding the Brüstle Stem-cell ruling in BioEdge.

On September 11th, 2015, UK Parliament voted on “assisted dying”. STI talked with professor David Albert Jones on the significance of the vote and the contribution of the Anscombe Bioethics Centre's to the debate. Read the interview here.

Download Prof. David Albert Jones' 8 reasons against assisted suicide